Programme

Timetable

09:50

Zoom

Online Walk In

Walk in via the zoomlink that you got via e-mail.

10:00

Zoom

Opening

Opening of the symposium by the chairwoman Hilde Roijackers and the master of ceremony dr. Paul Kouwer.

10:20

Zoom

First Lecture

"Reconstituting cytoskeletal systems in artificial cells." By prof. dr. Marileen Dogterom from the Technical University Delft.

11:10

Zoom

First Debate

What do we think about experiments on life?

11:40

Zoom

Second Lecture

"Quantum Internet, the unhackable future?" By msc. Sophie Hermans from the Technical University Delft.

12:30

Zoom

Lunch

Grab your take-away lunch at SSH& Sterrenbosch, provided by knettervers.

13:30

Zoom

KNCV Talk

A short talk by one of our sponsors.

13:40

Zoom

Third Lecture

"Lessons from spiders' silk: a new approach to producing fibre materials." By dr. Darshil Shah from the University of Cambridge.

14:30

Zoom

Second Debate

What do we think about open access?

15:00

Zoom

Coffee Break

Take a deep breath and grab some coffee, you deserve it.

15:15

Zoom

Fourth Lecture

"More or less? The right level of complexity." By dr. Daniele Tauriello from the Radboud University Nijmegen.

16:05

Zoom

Borrel

Do you still have some questions for the speakers? Do you want to talk with the committee? Or do you just want to drink the beer that you got at the pick-up point? Join our online borrel via spacial chat: https://spatial.chat/s/SigmaSymposiumBorrel (no account needed)

Speakers

prof. dr. Marileen Dogterom

Technical University Delft

Dit zijn de ontvangers van de NWO Spinozapremies, de hoogste onderscheiding  in de Nederlandse wetenschap | De Volkskrant

Curriculum Vitae

Prof. dr. Marileen Dogterom is a University Professor at the TU Delft and Medical Delta Professor at Leiden University. She is internationally renowned expert in experimental cell biophysics with a pioneering track record in biophysical research of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Over the years, her group has systematically worked on increasing functional biological complexity in reconstitution experiments, which paved the way for her current and future ambition to build synthetic cells. She published ~100 papers in high-ranking physics and biology journals. Dogterom actively and frequently collaborates with leading national and international researchers in both physics and biology. Since 2017, she leads the Dutch Consortium BaSyC (Building a Synthetic Cell) and is one of the initiators of the European Synthetic Cell Initiative.

Lecture information

In my group we are interested in understanding how dynamic and force-generating properties of the cytoskeleton contribute to the spatial organization of cells. I will highlight recent advances (and challenges) in our efforts to reconstitute minimal, functional cytoskeletal systems in artificial confinement. An example is the reconstitution of basic mitotic spindles in microfluidic droplets. These efforts fit in a long-term ambition to build, in collaboration with others, a minimal synthetic cell from scratch.

msc. Sophie Hermans

Technical University Delft

Curriculum Vitae

Sophie Hermans finished her masters Applied Physics at TU Delft in 2017. She is currently doing a PhD in the group of Prof. Ronald Hanson at the QuTech Research Institute. Furthermore, Sophie is one of the Faces of Science of the KNAW (the Dutch Royal Academy of Science).

Lecture information

In the early 20th century the foundations of quantum mechanics were discovered. Bohr, Schrödinger, Pauli, Heisenberg and many others developed theories on the physics of the very smallest, the physics of the single electrons, atoms and light particles. Now, roughly hundred years later, we are at a very exciting point; we can turn these thought experiments into real experiments. Moreover, we can not only study the phenomena that were predicted, we can even start to develop new technologies! In this lecture, you will hear about quantum bits, quantum communication channels and quantum internet. What is the fundamental difference between these so-called qubits and regular “classical” computer bits? And what does quantum information and communication mean? What are the advantages of a quantum internet? Does this lead to an unhackable future? I will focus on one physical implementation of a qubit; the nitrogen-vacancy centre, a defect in the diamond crystalline lattice. I will explain how we can use these colour defects as a quantum bit and show some experimental results on recent advances on a small-scale quantum network.

dr. Darshil Shah

University of Cambridge

Darshil Shah (@DarshilUShah) | Twitter

Curriculum Vitae

Shah is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Materials, and a senior researcher at the Centre for Natural Material Innovation, at the University of Cambridge. Shah works with scientists across disciplines developing biomaterials, such as engineered wood, bamboo, and natural fibre composites as lightweight, sustainable, and structural alternatives to conventional materials for various application sectors, including wind energy, construction, transport, healthcare, and consumer products. A major aim is to combine sustainability with performance and functionality. Three principle areas include applied research developing low-embodied energy structural composites; fundamental research exploring natural materials and structures for bioinspiration; and a combined approach designing smart, functional biomaterials.

Lecture information

Fibre materials have great impact on our daily lives, with their use ranging from beautiful textiles to aerospace composites. However, current manufacturing processes of man-made fibres are limited by extensive energy consumption due to high processing temperatures, and the use of various (often difficult to dispose) solvents. In contrast, spiders (and other creatures) can readily spin silk fibres with superb properties at room temperature using water as a solvent. Supramolecular materials comprise of two or more molecules held together via dynamic/transient non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, rather than chemical cross-links. Indeed, many natural materials, including spider’s silk, are supramolecular. Using supramolecular host-guest chemistry, we facilitated the aqueous self-assembly of functional polymers at multiple length scales to form supramolecular polymer-colloidal hydrogel composites. The resulting hydrogels (98 wt% water) exhibit extraordinary elasticity, and could be readily drawn into uniform silk-like ‘supramolecular fibres’ at room temperature. The fibre exhibits better tensile and remarkable damping (energy absorption) properties than viscose and artificial silks, hypothesised to arise from the complex interactions between ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ phases of the hydrogel’s constituents. When chemical cross-links are added, the fibre also exhibits properties such as humidity-tunability and super-contraction, unique to silks. Our approach offers a sustainable alternative to current fibre manufacturing strategies.

dr. Daniele Tauriello

Radboud University Nijmegen

ESMO 20th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer: Directory

Curriculum Vitae

Daniele Tauriello studied (bio-) chemistry and (cell) biology at Utrecht University. During his PhD with Madelon Maurice (UMC Utrecht), he focused on molecular mechanisms in Wnt signalling. In his postdoctoral years in the lab of Eduard Batlle (IRB Barcelona), he studied the tumour microenvironment. He developed an immunocompetent, metastatic colon cancer mouse model that recapitulates human disease including key poor prognosis markers. Daniele showed that TGFβ drives immune evasion in that model, and therefore may be a prime therapeutic target for patients with advanced disease. In his own lab, he continues the investigation of immune evasion to find therapeutic strategies that can reactivate anti-cancer immunity.

Lecture information

Over the last decade or so, a combination of technological and conceptual tendencies have pushed for ever greater complexity and ambition in the life sciences. This makes today a very exciting time to be in research, but it also raises the bar for the individual scientist or average research group considerably. What level of complexity is optimal to contribute to improving therapeutic efficacy or patient quality of life? What are the optimal tools and models? For the specific case of oncology, we have seen the emergence and growth of fields that are rich in complexity, such as the tumour microenvironment and cancer immunology. Discussing my own work in modelling colorectal cancer liver metastasis and overcoming immune evasion in that setting, I will come back to the question of how to approach this complexity. Spoiler alert: we love organoids.

MoC: dr. Paul Kouwer

Radboud University Nijmegen

Curriculum Vitae

Paul Kouwer is associate professor in Molecular Materials and Systems Chemistry at Radboud University. He studied Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry at the University of Groningen and received his PhD from the Delft University of Technology. After post-doc positions at the University of Hull and MIT, he moved to Nijmegen. His research centers around the interdisciplinary field of synthetic biomaterials with a focus on soft hydrogels that have been developed at Radboud University and that closely mimic many aspects of the extracellular matrix. He and his team, a mixture of materials chemists and biologists, study how they can use these materials to manipulate cell behavior beyond Nature’s limits.

Lecture information

Paul Kouwer will be the Master of Ceremony for the Sigma Symposium 2021.