April 4th: Save the Date!

The next Sigma Symposium will take place in the Huygens building on April 4th, 2019. Tickets will both be sold in Sigma's board room and on the Sigma website.

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25 years of Sigma Symposium has resulted in some impressive statistics:

This year, the Sigma Symposium will be hosted for the 24th time!

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During that time, approximately 2000 tickets have been sold

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And over 100 speakers have presented their research.

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The Speakers

This year, four wonderful speakers will be present at our symposium. Scroll on one of their images to read about who they are and what they will talk about.

dr. Peter KorevaarMaster of ceremony

Peter Korevaar is assistant professor at the Radboud University Nijmegen in the Institute for Molecules
and Materials (IMM). He studied Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the Eindhoven University of
Technology (TU/e) and obtained his MSc. degree cum laude in 2010. Thereafter, he started a PhD
project in the research group of prof. Bert Meijer, where he studied supramolecular self-assembly of pi-
conjugated materials. In 2014, he obtained his PhD degree cum laude at the TU/e. Supported by an
NWO Rubicon fellowship, he continued as a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard University (USA),
working in the group of prof. Joanna Aizenberg on smart hydrogel materials. In 2017, he started the Life-
like Materials research group at Radboud University, supported by NWO Veni and Start-up grants, as
well as the Gravitation program for Functional Molecular Systems. The research of his lab focusses on
chemical systems that – like living matter – can adapt themselves to changes in their environment. For
example, the lab is working on molecules that, inspired on the growth of fungi, self-assemble into
centimeter-long wires and thereby coordinate the transport of chemical signals over flat substrates that
can ultimately be used in autonomously operating devices.

dr. Peter KorevaarMaster of ceremony

Peter Korevaar is assistant professor at the Radboud University Nijmegen in the Institute for Molecules
and Materials (IMM). He studied Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the Eindhoven University of
Technology (TU/e) and obtained his MSc. degree cum laude in 2010. Thereafter, he started a PhD
project in the research group of prof. Bert Meijer, where he studied supramolecular self-assembly of pi-
conjugated materials. In 2014, he obtained his PhD degree cum laude at the TU/e. Supported by an
NWO Rubicon fellowship, he continued as a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard University (USA),
working in the group of prof. Joanna Aizenberg on smart hydrogel materials. In 2017, he started the Life-
like Materials research group at Radboud University, supported by NWO Veni and Start-up grants, as
well as the Gravitation program for Functional Molecular Systems. The research of his lab focusses on
chemical systems that – like living matter – can adapt themselves to changes in their environment. For
example, the lab is working on molecules that, inspired on the growth of fungi, self-assemble into
centimeter-long wires and thereby coordinate the transport of chemical signals over flat substrates that
can ultimately be used in autonomously operating devices.

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dr. Thomas RohrEuropean Space Agency

Lecture:
Use and challenges of polymer materials for space applications

Curriculum Vitae
Thomas Rohr studied chemistry at the Vienna University of Technology and received his PhD in polymer chemistry in 2000. After a PostDoc position at UC Berkeley he joined the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2003, at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands. During the initial years his responsibilities covered expert support for the selection of materials and processes for space applications as well as testing and assessment of durability of materials for in-orbit performance. After the European REACH regulation entered into force in 2007, his focus shifted to obsolescence management of materials and processes. The main goal was to establish an early warning system as well as to manage corrective actions together with European space industry and national space agencies to prevent future supply chain disruptions through obsolescence. In 2018 he became Head of the Materials and Processes Section, with has the primary objective to ensure that materials and manufacturing processes used to assemble spacecrafts or launchers are fit for purpose over the life of the mission. In this function he is also responsible for implementation of technology development activities such as advanced materials and manufacturing technologies enabling future space missions.

dr. Thomas RohrEuropean Space Agency

Lecture:
Use and challenges of polymer materials for space applications

Curriculum Vitae
Thomas Rohr studied chemistry at the Vienna University of Technology and received his PhD in polymer chemistry in 2000. After a PostDoc position at UC Berkeley he joined the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2003, at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands. During the initial years his responsibilities covered expert support for the selection of materials and processes for space applications as well as testing and assessment of durability of materials for in-orbit performance. After the European REACH regulation entered into force in 2007, his focus shifted to obsolescence management of materials and processes. The main goal was to establish an early warning system as well as to manage corrective actions together with European space industry and national space agencies to prevent future supply chain disruptions through obsolescence. In 2018 he became Head of the Materials and Processes Section, with has the primary objective to ensure that materials and manufacturing processes used to assemble spacecrafts or launchers are fit for purpose over the life of the mission. In this function he is also responsible for implementation of technology development activities such as advanced materials and manufacturing technologies enabling future space missions.

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dr. René JanssenTechnical University Eindhoven

Lecture:
Polymer solar energy

Polymer solar cells present fascinating opportunities and challenges for scientific research and technological development and may represent a future source of renewable energy. The semiconducting polymers that form the active layer of a solar cell have to fulfil several chemical, optical electronic, and morphological requirements to provide high power conversion efficiencies. After introducing the working principles of polymer solar cells, recent progress in the field will be presented. It will be shown that controlling polymer structure and device architecture is crucial to unfold the intrinsic limits of these materials. A substantial gain in performance can further be realized using multi-junction solar cells in which two or more polymer layers are stacked. By alternate stacking photoactive and interconnecting layers two, three, and four junction polymer solar cells have been developed that exhibit high performance. These multi-junction can also be used to store solar energy in chemical bonds via photo-electrochemical cells that split water or reduce carbon dioxide.

Curriculum Vitae
René Janssen is University Professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the
Departments of Chemical Engineering & Chemistry and Applied Physics. He received his Ph.D. in 1987 for a thesis on electron spin resonance. His present research focuses on the chemistry and physics of functional nanostructured organic and inorganic molecular materials and devices in which materials synthesis, spectroscopy, structural characterization and developing prototype devices are combined. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed papers and is recipient of the NWO Spinoza Prize and an ERC Advanced Grant.

dr. René JanssenTechnical University Eindhoven

Lecture:
Polymer solar energy

Polymer solar cells present fascinating opportunities and challenges for scientific research and technological development and may represent a future source of renewable energy. The semiconducting polymers that form the active layer of a solar cell have to fulfil several chemical, optical electronic, and morphological requirements to provide high power conversion efficiencies. After introducing the working principles of polymer solar cells, recent progress in the field will be presented. It will be shown that controlling polymer structure and device architecture is crucial to unfold the intrinsic limits of these materials. A substantial gain in performance can further be realized using multi-junction solar cells in which two or more polymer layers are stacked. By alternate stacking photoactive and interconnecting layers two, three, and four junction polymer solar cells have been developed that exhibit high performance. These multi-junction can also be used to store solar energy in chemical bonds via photo-electrochemical cells that split water or reduce carbon dioxide.

Curriculum Vitae
René Janssen is University Professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the
Departments of Chemical Engineering & Chemistry and Applied Physics. He received his Ph.D. in 1987 for a thesis on electron spin resonance. His present research focuses on the chemistry and physics of functional nanostructured organic and inorganic molecular materials and devices in which materials synthesis, spectroscopy, structural characterization and developing prototype devices are combined. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed papers and is recipient of the NWO Spinoza Prize and an ERC Advanced Grant.

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prof. dr. Sybrand van der zwaagTechnical University Delft

Lecture:
Self-healing polymers: from simply being 'good' to showing self healing behaviour.

Curriculum Vitae
Sybrand van der Zwaag holds the chair Novel Aerospace Materials at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the TU Delft. For many years he has been the scientific direction of the national research program on Self Healing Materials and the Dutch Polymer Institute. His research focusses on novel material concepts having an industrial potential.

prof. dr. Sybrand van der zwaagTechnical University Delft

Lecture:
Self-healing polymers: from simply being 'good' to showing self healing behaviour.

Curriculum Vitae
Sybrand van der Zwaag holds the chair Novel Aerospace Materials at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the TU Delft. For many years he has been the scientific direction of the national research program on Self Healing Materials and the Dutch Polymer Institute. His research focusses on novel material concepts having an industrial potential.

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dr. ir. Hans BouwmeesterWageningen University

Lecture:
Microplastics: Is it harmful to our bodies and how can we study the possible health threats?

Curriculum Vitae

My name is Hans Bouwmeester. I’m working as associate professor at the division of toxicology of Wageningen University. I’m trained as biologist and did my PhD at Utrecht Medical Center on to study the neuronal development in the postnatal brain of rodents. Upon returning to Wageningen I studied the potential hazards of engineered nanoparticles for human health. I focus on the oral route of exposure. For this we are developing advanced in vitro models for the human intestine like gut-on-a-chip models.

dr. ir. Hans BouwmeesterWageningen University

Lecture:
Microplastics: Is it harmful to our bodies and how can we study the possible health threats?

Curriculum Vitae

My name is Hans Bouwmeester. I’m working as associate professor at the division of toxicology of Wageningen University. I’m trained as biologist and did my PhD at Utrecht Medical Center on to study the neuronal development in the postnatal brain of rodents. Upon returning to Wageningen I studied the potential hazards of engineered nanoparticles for human health. I focus on the oral route of exposure. For this we are developing advanced in vitro models for the human intestine like gut-on-a-chip models.

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History

This symposium will be the twenty-fourth symposium organised by the Sigma Symposium Committee. On the history-page a brief overview of the diversity of the symposia of previous years can be found!

Organising committee

This symposium is organised by nine students of the study association of the Molecular Sciences cluster of the Radboud University in Nijmegen: Sigma. Would you like to know more about them? Click here!